Feb 102016
 

The open-source hardware statement of principles and definition were developed by members of the OSHWA board and working group along with others. These documents were originally edited on the wiki at freedomdefined.org, which you can visit to see endorsements of the definition and to add your own.

Open Source Hardware (OSHW) Statement of Principles 1.0

Open source hardware is hardware whose design is made publicly available so that anyone can study, modify, distribute, make, and sell the design or hardware based on that design. The hardware’s source, the design from which it is made, is available in the preferred format for making modifications to it. Ideally, open source hardware uses readily-available components and materials, standard processes, open infrastructure, unrestricted content, and open-source design tools to maximize the ability of individuals to make and use hardware. Open source hardware gives people the freedom to control their technology while sharing knowledge and encouraging commerce through the open exchange of designs.

Open Source Hardware (OSHW) Definition 1.0

The Open Source Hardware (OSHW) Definition 1.0 is based on the Open Source Definition for Open Source Software. That definition was created by Bruce Perens and the Debian developers as the Debian Free Software Guidelines.

Introduction
Open Source Hardware (OSHW) is a term for tangible artifacts — machines, devices, or other physical things — whose design has been released to the public in such a way that anyone can make, modify, distribute, and use those things. This definition is intended to help provide guidelines for the development and evaluation of licenses for Open Source Hardware.

Hardware is different from software in that physical resources must always be committed for the creation of physical goods. Accordingly, persons or companies producing items (“products”) under an OSHW license have an obligation to make it clear that such products are not manufactured, sold, warrantied, or otherwise sanctioned by the original designer and also not to make use of any trademarks owned by the original designer.

The distribution terms of Open Source Hardware must comply with the following criteria:

1. Documentation
The hardware must be released with documentation including design files, and must allow modification and distribution of the design files. Where documentation is not furnished with the physical product, there must be a well-publicized means of obtaining this documentation for no more than a reasonable reproduction cost, preferably downloading via the Internet without charge. The documentation must include design files in the preferred format for making changes, for example the native file format of a CAD program. Deliberately obfuscated design files are not allowed. Intermediate forms analogous to compiled computer code — such as printer-ready copper artwork from a CAD program — are not allowed as substitutes. The license may require that the design files are provided in fully-documented, open format(s).

2. Scope
The documentation for the hardware must clearly specify what portion of the design, if not all, is being released under the license.

3. Necessary Software
If the licensed design requires software, embedded or otherwise, to operate properly and fulfill its essential functions, then the license may require that one of the following conditions are met:
a) The interfaces are sufficiently documented such that it could reasonably be considered straightforward to write open source software that allows the device to operate properly and fulfill its essential functions. For example, this may include the use of detailed signal timing diagrams or pseudocode to clearly illustrate the interface in operation.
b) The necessary software is released under an OSI-approved open source license.

4. Derived Works
The license shall allow modifications and derived works, and shall allow them to be distributed under the same terms as the license of the original work. The license shall allow for the manufacture, sale, distribution, and use of products created from the design files, the design files themselves, and derivatives thereof.

5. Free redistribution
The license shall not restrict any party from selling or giving away the project documentation. The license shall not require a royalty or other fee for such sale. The license shall not require any royalty or fee related to the sale of derived works.

6. Attribution
The license may require derived documents, and copyright notices associated with devices, to provide attribution to the licensors when distributing design files, manufactured products, and/or derivatives thereof. The license may require that this information be accessible to the end-user using the device normally, but shall not specify a specific format of display. The license may require derived works to carry a different name or version number from the original design.

7. No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups
The license must not discriminate against any person or group of persons.

8. No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor
The license must not restrict anyone from making use of the work (including manufactured hardware) in a specific field of endeavor. For example, it must not restrict the hardware from being used in a business, or from being used in nuclear research.

9. Distribution of License
The rights granted by the license must apply to all to whom the work is redistributed without the need for execution of an additional license by those parties.

10. License Must Not Be Specific to a Product
The rights granted by the license must not depend on the licensed work being part of a particular product. If a portion is extracted from a work and used or distributed within the terms of the license, all parties to whom that work is redistributed should have the same rights as those that are granted for the original work.

11. License Must Not Restrict Other Hardware or Software
The license must not place restrictions on other items that are aggregated with the licensed work but not derivative of it. For example, the license must not insist that all other hardware sold with the licensed item be open source, nor that only open source software be used external to the device.

12. License Must Be Technology-Neutral
No provision of the license may be predicated on any individual technology, specific part or component, material, or style of interface or use thereof.

Afterword
The signatories of this Open Source Hardware definition recognize that the open source movement represents only one way of sharing information. We encourage and support all forms of openness and collaboration, whether or not they fit this definition.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

reference: oshwa [dot] org

 Posted by at 0:02
Feb 032016
 

Python 3 – Corso Introduttivo

Una introduzione al linguaggio di programmazione Python 3 adatto per chi inizia a programmare o per chi sta allargando le proprie conoscenze.  Il corso avrà un approccio pratico con prove e esempi costruiti assieme.

A chi è rivolto: giovani, adulti, smanettoni, appassionati di informatica e professionisti del settore

A cura di Stefano Fraccaro, programmatore,formatore e socio MontelLUG e Free Software Foundation Europe

Programma 
– Tipi di dato
– Tuple, liste e dizionari
– Funzioni e parametri
– Condizioni “if”
– Ciclo “for”
– Ciclo “while” Lettura e scrittura su file Classi

Il corso si svolgerà nell’arco di 5 serate dalle 21.00 alle 23.00 (giovedì):

11 febbraio
3 e 24 marzo
14 e 28 aprile

Costo: € 15 per l’intero corso

gratuito per soci Montellug, TV-AUG  e studenti.
Per l’iscrizione inviare email a: info@montellug.it oppure a info@fablabcfv.org
Location: FabLab Castelfranco Veneto, 31033 Castelfranco Veneto via Sile 24
 Posted by at 0:53
Gen 302016
 


“Casa Jasmina” is a two-year pilot project in the business space of domestic electronic networking, or, “the Internet of Things in the Home.” Our goal is to integrate traditional Italian skills in furniture and interior design with emergent skills in Italian open-source electronics.The project is a showplace inside the large industrial building already shared by Toolbox Co-Working, Fablab Torino and Officine Arduino.
Casa Jasmina showplace has three main functions:

  • A real-world testbed for hacks, experiments and innovative IoT and digital fabrication projects.
  • A curated space for public exposure of excellent artifacts and best practices.
  • A guest-house for occasional visitors to Toolbox, Officine Arduino and Fablab Torino.

Although it resembles an apartment home, Casa Jasmina is actually a combination of lab, gallery space and B&B, so it needs dynamic management. Casa Jasmina is not merely a kitchen, library, bedroom, and bathroom. It’s a public interface for a larger Internet-of-Things process of building things, acquiring installing things, removing things, repairing and maintaining things, storing things, recording and linking to things, and, last but very importantly, getting rid of things.
We are building Casa Jasmina in order to encourage industries that will create tomorrow’s living spaces.
Casa Jasmina is an incubator, and its purpose is industry-boosting in the Torino and Piemonte IoT space. The successors of the Casa Jasmina project will be real homes with real, innovative products inside.

References:
casajasmina.arduino [dot] cc
The Internet of Things Awards

 Posted by at 0:59
Gen 242016
 

Learn the fundamentals of robotics and gain hands-on programming experience with robots applied in everyday life and in a wide variety of industries.

The Robotics Specialization introduces you to how robots sense and reason about the world they live, how they plan three dimensional movements in a dynamic environment and how they fly or run while adapting to uncertainties in the environment. You will be exposed to real world examples with drones, legged robots and driverless cars. The courses build towards a capstone in which you will learn how to program robots to perform a variety of tasks in unstructured, dynamic environments. To see a video introduction from Penn Engineering’s Dean Vijay Kumar, please click here.

Courses:
1) Robotics: Aerial Robotics
2) Robotics: Computational Motion Planning
3) Robotics: Mobility
4) Robotics: Perception
4) Robotics: Estimation and Learning
5) Robotics: Capstone

 Posted by at 14:38
Gen 152016
 

MKR1000 is a powerful board that combines the functionality of the Zero and the Wi-Fi Shield. It is the ideal solution for makers wanting to design IoT projects with minimal previous experience in networking.

Arduino MKR1000 is based on the Atmel ATSAMW25 SoC (System on Chip), that is part of the SmartConnect family of Atmel Wireless devices, specifically designed for IoT projects and devices.

The ATSAMW25 is composed of three main blocks:
• SAMD21 Cortex-M0+ 32bit low power ARM MCU
• WINC1500 low power 2.4GHz IEEE® 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi
• ECC508 CryptoAuthentication
The ATSAMW25 includes also a single 1×1 stream PCB Antenna.
This board has been designed to offers a practical and cost effective solution for makers seeking to add Wi-Fi connectivity to their projects with minimal previous experience in networking.

The design includes a Li-Po charging circuit that allows the Arduino/Genuino MKR1000 to run on battery power or external 5V, charging the Li-Po battery while running on external power. Switching from one source to the other is done automatically.

A good 32 bit computational power similar to the Zero board, the usual rich set of I/O interfaces, low power Wi-Fi with a Cryptochip for secure communication, and the ease of use of the Arduino Software (IDE) for code development and programming. All these features make this board the preferred choice for the emerging IoT battery-powered projects in a compact form factor.

The USB port can be used to supply power (5V) to the board.
The Arduino/Genuino MKR1000 is able to run with or without the Li-Po battery connected and has limited power consumption.

reference: arduino [dot] cc

 Posted by at 0:55
Dic 172015
 

96Boards is the first open specification to define a platform for the delivery of compatible low-cost, small footprint 32-bit and 64-bit Cortex-A boards from the range of ARM SoC vendors.
Standardized expansion buses for peripheral I/O, display and cameras allow the hardware ecosystem to develop a range of compatible add-on products that will work on any 96Boards product over the lifetime of the platform.

The Linaro Community Board Group (LCG)
The 96Boards standard specification and this website are maintained by the Linaro Community Board Group (LCG).
Linaro is a collaborative software engineering organization focused on the ARM architecture.
Corporate members of Linaro provide funding and engineers plus direction through various steering committees and resources are split into semi-autonomous groups with their own members.
LCG is one of these groups and its member companies contribute to the development of the 96Boards specification, the maintenance of this website and support for the software builds for their compatible boards.

reference: 96Boards [dot] org

 Posted by at 0:09
Dic 152015
 

What is a fab lab?
Fab labs are a global network of local labs, enabling invention by providing access to tools for digital fabrication

What’s in a fab lab?
Fab labs share an evolving inventory of core capabilities to make (almost) anything, allowing people and projects to be shared

What does the fab lab network provide?
Operational, educational, technical, financial, and logistical assistance beyond what’s available within one lab

Who can use a fab lab?
Fab labs are available as a community resource, offering open access for individuals as well as scheduled access for programs

What are your responsibilities?
safety: not hurting people or machines
operations: assisting with cleaning, maintaining, and improving the lab
knowledge: contributing to documentation and instruction

Who owns fab lab inventions?
Designs and processes developed in fab labs can be protected and sold however an inventor chooses, but should remain available for individuals to use and learn from

How can businesses use a fab lab?
Commercial activities can be prototyped and incubated in a fab lab, but they must not conflict with other uses, they should grow beyond rather than within the lab, and they are expected to benefit the inventors, labs, and networks that contribute to their success

draft: October 20, 2012

reference: FabFoundation [dot] org

 Posted by at 22:54